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Archaeology Wordsmith

Archeology. The International History Project. Date:2003. Archeology is the scientific study of past human culture and behavior, from the origins of humans to the Results for artifact: (View exact match) artifact SYNONYMS OR RELATED TERMS: artefact CATEGORY: artifact DEFINITION: Any object (article, building, container, Geologists and archaeologists searching in 1987 for limestone sinkholes (cenotes) used as water sources at ancient Mayan sites in northern Yucatán discovered the Principles of Stratigraphy. Stratigraphy is the study of strata (sedimentary layers) in the Earth's crust. Geologist in the 1800s worked out 7 basic principles of Back to Laser Instruments and Applications Sub-Table of Contents. General Interferometers Basics of Interferometry and Interferometers The dictionary definition


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Archeology is the scientific study of past human culture and behavior, from the origins of humans to the present. Archaeology studies past human behavior through the examination of material remains of previous human societies. These remains include the fossils (preserved bones) of humans, food remains, the ruins of buildings, and human artifacts—items such as tools, pottery, and jewelry. From their studies, archaeologists attempt to reconstruct past ways of life. Archaeology is an important field of anthropology, which is the broad study of human culture and biology. Archaeologists concentrate their studies on past societies and changes in those societies over extremely long periods of time.

popups must be enabled or IE users press and hold the control key while clicking With its focus on the ancient past, archaeology somewhat resembles paleontology—the study of fossils of long-extinct animals, such as dinosaurs. However, archaeology is distinct from paleontology and studies only past human life. Archaeology also examines many of the same topics explored by historians. But unlike history—the study of written records such as government archives, personal correspondence, and business documents—most of the information gathered in archaeology comes from the study of objects lying on or under the ground 

Archaeologists refer to the vast store of information about the human past as the archaeological record. The archeological record encompasses every area of the world that has ever been occupied by humans, as well as all of the material remains contained in those areas. Archaeologists study the archaeological record through field surveys and excavations and through the laboratory study of collected materials.

Many of the objects left behind by past human societies are not present in the archaeological record because they have disintegrated over time. The material remains that still exist after hundreds, thousands, or millions of years have survived because of favorable preservation conditions in the soil or atmosphere. For the most part, the only things that survive are durable items such as potsherds (small fragments of pottery), tools or buildings of stone, bones, and teeth (which survive because they are covered with hard enamel). Because many items disintegrate over time, archaeologists get an incomplete view of the past that they must fill in with other kinds of information and educated reasoning. On rare occasions, however, delicate objects have been preserved. For example, fabrics and flowers were found in the celebrated tomb of Tutankhamun, an Egyptian pharaoh who was buried in 1323 BC.